Kettler Stroker Rowing Machine Review – Good Or Bad?

You landed on this page means you are clearly considering the Kettler’s Home Stroker Rower.

And I am going to tear-down this indoor rower for you today in this review article.

So without further ado, let’s discuss why do most people consider an indoor rower by Kettler as their first budget home rowing machine.

In a hurry?
Go, look at my conclusive remarks on whether to pick the Kettler or some other machine. => Conclusive Remarks on Kettler Stroker

Why Kettler Stroker?

Kettler is a German company that was founded in 1949 by Heinz Kettler.

Yes, ‘German’ who are known to build quality machinery for ages.

That german branding alone is a good time and tested reason to stand behind this brand.

But wait;

There are more things that go into making a truly quality product.

The Design

There is absolutely no doubt in this that Kettler has produces one of the best looking indoor rowers in the market – considering the price bracket it comes in.

If you ask me to rate this specific model on its looks. I would give it a 7.5 on 10.

Portability

Portability is something that we can not overlook with these types of bulky fitness machines. Especially if you are looking for a home rower.

It’s a ‘Yes’ for Kettler on portability. They have designed this rower keeping space-saving cues in mind.

But ya, foldable design is something that now every other company is giving with their rowing machines, especially if it’s magnetic resistance rower.

Noise Levels

The noise levels are also kept under control by employing some smart design changes.

Like, the pulling cord used in the machine is made of nylon, so it barely produces any noise.

The only noise it makes is when the seat slides on the rail; which is natural with all the indoor rowers.

Features and Specifications of Kettler Stroker

kettler stroker rowing machine

Flywheel:

The flywheel on this machine weighs about 4 Kg, which ensures its quiet and smooth functioning. The resistance generated by the machine is magnetic.

By the way, the resistance can be adjusted by an index of 1 to 8, for a variety of fitness levels, which I think is a good wide range of resistance levels on offer.

The light-weighted flywheel makes less noise during the workout, which is a significant aspect of any rowing machine. The features are somewhat similar to other high priced machines but at an affordable price.

Display Monitor:

kettler stroker rower monitor

Stroker is equipped with a multi-functional LCD display. The LCD doesn’t require additional AC power since it uses 2 AA batteries (that are included). Monitor functionalities include –

  • Time spent on rowing
  • Oar Strokes
  • Polar T34 chest strap heart rate monitor (included)
  • Current Cadence (number of strokes rowed per minute)
  • Cumulative Distance
  • Kilo-joules

Heart Rate Measurement:

A Polar T-34 chest strap is used to measure the heart rate during rowing. That can later be stored in a computer and help to track your daily fitness improvements.

Pros
  • Looks
  • Heart rate monitor
  • Good build quality at low price
  • Space-saving foldable design
  • 8 resistance levels
  • Lifetime warranty on frame and 3 years on parts
  • 285 lbs: max user weight
Cons
  • Tiny Screen
  • Somewhat inaccurate readings
  • Lack of proper instructions to setup
  • On powering off, it loses the personal preferences you entered.

My Conclusive Words

Considering it an old model by Kettler and since the technology is changing pretty fast as well. There are more number of choices are available to us in affordable home rowers than ever before.

Me being a rower from some last 5 solid years, I have tried several indoor rowing machines. And based on that experience, I would suggest you to choose between this Kettler Stroker or the Joroto’s magnetic indoor rower.

How To Use Kettler Stroker Rowing Machine

I hope you liked my review and if it helped you in making the right purchase decision with Kettler Stroker. Please do let me know in the comments below. 🙂

Anam

Anam Shabista is a writer, blogger, aspiring chartered accountant, and author at RowingFeed.